Recent CodeSOD

Code Snippet Of the Day (CodeSOD) features interesting and usually incorrect code snippets taken from actual production code in a commercial and/or open source software projects.

Dec 2017

How is an Employee ID like a Writing Desk?

by in CodeSOD on

Chris D’s has a problem. We can see a hint of the kind of problem he needs to deal with by looking at this code:

   RETURN varchar2
  Employee_Name varchar2(50);
   SELECT  employee_name INTO Employee_Name
     FROM eyps_manager.tbemployee_history
    WHERE  ROWNUM=1 AND   employee_id = EMPLOYEE_ID
          AND effective_start_date <= Action_Date
          AND (Action_Date < effective_end_date OR effective_end_date IS NULL);

   RETURN (Employee_Name);

Titration Frustration

by in CodeSOD on

From submitter Christoph comes a function that makes your average regex seem not all that bad, actually:

According to "What is a Titration?" we learn that "a titration is a technique where a solution of known concentration is used to determine the concentration of an unknown solution." Since this is an often needed calculation in a laboratory, we can write a program to solve this problem for us.

Part of the solver is a formula parser, which needs to accept variable names (either lower or upper case letters), decimal numbers, and any of '+-*/^()' for mathematical operators. Presented here is the part of the code for the solveTitration() function that deals with parsing of the formula. Try to read it in an 80 chars/line window. Once with wrapping enabled, and once with wrapping disabled and horizontal scrolling. Enjoy!

ALM Tools Could Fix This

by in CodeSOD on

I’m old enough that, when I got into IT, we just called our organizational techniques “software engineering”. It drifted into “project management”, then the “software development life-cycle”, and lately “application life-cycle management (ALM)”.

No matter what you call it, you apply these techniques so that you can at least attempt to release software that meets the requirements and is reasonably free from defects.

A Type of Standard

by in CodeSOD on

I’ve brushed up against the automotive industry in the past, and have gained a sense about how automotive companies and their suppliers develop custom software. That is to say, they hack at it until someone from the business side says, “Yes, that’s what we wanted.” 90% of the development time is spent doing re-work (because no one, including the customer, understood the requirements) and putting out fires (because no one, including the customer, understood the requirements well enough to tell you how to test it, so things are going wrong in production).

Mary is writing some software that needs to perform automated testing on automotive components. The good news is that the automotive industry has adopted a standard API for accomplishing this goal. The bad news is that the API was designed by the automotive industry. Developing standards, under ideal conditions, is hard. Developing standards in an industry that is still struggling with software quality and hasn’t quite fully adopted the idea of cross-vendor standardization in the first place?

Pounding Away

by in CodeSOD on

“Hey, Herbie, we need you to add code to our e-commerce package to send an email with order details in it,” was the requirement.

“You mean like a notification? Order confirmation?”