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The Manager Who Knew Everything

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Have you ever worked for/with a manager that knows everything about everything? You know the sort; no matter what the issue, they stubbornly have an answer. It might be wrong, but they have an answer, and no amount of reason, intelligent thought, common sense or hand puppets will make them understand. For those occasions, you need to resort to a metaphorical clue-bat.

A few decades ago, I worked for a place that had a chief security officer who knew everything there was to know about securing their systems. Nothing could get past the policies she had put in place. Nobody could ever come up with any mechanism that could bypass her concrete walls, blockades and insurmountable defenses.


Many Happy Returns

by in CodeSOD on

We've all encountered a situation where changing requirements caused some function that had a single native return type to need to return a second value. One possible solution is to put the two return values in some wrapper class as follows:


Passing Messages

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About 15 years a go, I had this job where I was requested to set up and administer an MQ connection from our company to the Depository Trust & Clearing Corporation (DTCC). Since I had no prior experience with MQ, I picked up the manual, learned a few commands, and in a day or so, had a script to create queue managers, queues, disk backing stores, etc. I got the system analysts (SA's) at both ends on the phone and in ten minutes had connectivity to their test and production environments. Access was applied for and granted to relevant individuals and applications, and application coding could begin.

Pyramid of Caius Cestius exterior, showing the giant wall which blocks everything
By Torquatus - Own work

I didn't know the full and complete way to manage most of the features of MQ, but I had figured out enough to properly support what we needed. Total time was 2.5 man-days of effort.


Business Driven Development

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Every now and then, you come across a special project. You know the sort, where some business user decides that they know exactly what they need and exactly how it should be built. They get the buy-in of some C-level shmoe by making sure that their lips have intimate knowledge of said C-level butt. Once they have funding, they have people hired and begin to bark orders.

Toonces, the Driving Cat

About 8 years ago, I had the privilege experience of being on such a project. When we were given the phase-I specs, all the senior tech people immediately said that there was no way to perform a sane daily backup and data-roll for the next day. The response was "We're not going to worry about backups and daily book-rolls until later". We all just cringed, made like good little HPCs and followed our orders to march onward.


Yes == No

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For decades, I worked in an industry where you were never allowed to say no to a user, no matter how ridiculous the request. You had to suck it up and figure out a way to deliver on insane requests, regardless of the technical debt they inflicted.

Canada Stop sign.svg


An Obvious Requirement

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Requirements. That magical set of instructions that tell you specifically what you need to build and test. Users can't be bothered to write them, and even if they could, they have no idea how to tell you what they want. It doesn't help that many developers are incapable of following instructions since they rarely exist, and when they do, they usually aren't worth the coffee-stained napkin upon which they're scribbled.

A sign warning that a footpath containing stairs isn't suitable for wheelchairs

That said, we try our best to build what we think our users need. We attempt to make it fairly straightforward to use what we build. The button marked Reports most likely leads to something to do with generating/reading/whatever-ing reports. Of course, sometimes a particular feature is buried several layers deep and requires multiple levels of ribbons, menus, sub-menus, dialogs, sub-dialogs and tabs before you find the checkbox you want. Since us developers as a group are, by nature, somewhat anal retentive, we try to keep related features grouped so that you can generally guess what path to try to find something. And we often supply a Help feature to tell you how to find it when you can't.


The Search for Truth

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Every time you change existing code, you break some other part of the system. You may not realize it, but you do. It may show up in the form of a broken unit test, but that presumes that a) said unit test exists, and b) it properly tests the aspect of the code you are changing. Sadly, more often than not, there is either no test to cover your change, or any test that does exist doesn't handle the case you are changing.

Nicolai Abildgaard - Diogenes der lyser i mørket med en lygte.jpg


The Proprietary Format

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Have you ever secured something with a lock? The intent is that at some point in the future, you'll use the requisite key to regain access to it. Of course, the underlying assumption is that you actually have the key. How do you open a lock once you've lost the key? That's when you need to get creative. Lock picks. Bolt cutters. Blow torch. GAU-8...

In 2004, Ben S. went on a solo bicycle tour, and for reasons of weight, his only computer was a Handspring Visor Deluxe PDA running Palm OS. He had an external, folding keyboard that he would use to type his notes from each day of the trip. To keep these notes organized by day, he stored them in the Datebook (calendar) app as all-day events. The PDA would sync with a desktop computer using a Handspring-branded fork of the Palm Desktop software. The whole Datebook could then be exported as a text file from there. As such, Ben figured his notes were safe. After the trip ended, he bought a Windows PC that he had until 2010, but he never quite got around to exporting the text file. After he switched to using a Mac, he copied the files to the Mac and gave away the PC.

Handspring Treo 90

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